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Short summary

Llovizna is a young, brave, raven haired beauty, who was raised by Marhuanta Sánchez, a former prostitute and a companion of Llovizna's grandfather, Caruachi del Río. Llovizna's biological mother, Caruachi's daughter, Resplandor died immediately after giving her birth. Pío Heres Briceño is the ruthless owner of the steel mill, where Caruachi works and Llovizna's biological father. A tragic accident at the steel mill takes Caruachi's life. However, on his death bed Caruachi reveals to Llovizna that Pío robbed him of his investment in the steel mill 20 years prior, and that Pío is responsible for the death of her mother. This drives Llovizna to get Caruachi's position at the steel mill. There she meets Orinoco Fuego, a handsome and honorable man and they fall in love. But Jesus Ferrer, the chief engineer and Pío's right hand man many years ago was actually Caroní Fuego, Orinoco's older brother. Now he owes all his prestige and loyalty to Pío. Fate so has it that when Caroní meets ...

The Orinoco character' surname is Fuego, which means fire.

User reviews


  • comment
    • Author: Itiannta
    Another viewer evidently missed the point of the production style and also translated too literally ... "Llovisna" ... or "Misty" not 'Drizzlily Rains".

    Set in Venezuela in the late 1930's or 40's ... "Llovisna " romantically portrayed the transition of post-Gomez dictatorship Venezuela in the midst of greater post-oil discovery and industrialization in that country's Saar-Ruhr basin .. the Orinico basin; and metropolitan Caracas population explosion. The telenovela virtually made the career of "Ms.Hevci Scarlet Ortiz" -- establishing the former Miss Venezuela contestant as a fine actress ... and through the use of the cim=nematic style of 'verismo' & richly used location scenery and the occasional 'cinema verite' of the style (interlacing footage) to portray lives in the rising working and middle class of Venezuela. As a television production -- good stage craft were used to portray an intimate family - mother and her daughters sustaining a cafe-bar in an old hotel, a padrone like 'god-father' with his shadowy telepathic like influence .. his desire for the truth - for both 'he' and - of his daughter 'Llovisna'.

    It has always been a favorite of mine for its verismo portrayal of themes of crime - crooked business or excessive economic power ... passion & love -- and the interlacing of urbanism (a 30's style boxing or sporting scene is remembered) -- and as a production especially breaching the excessive segregation appearance of some Colombian & Venezuelan exports from those mostly 'mixto' nations.

    Adapted for the television from a good novel - set in the 30's .. because of its time period -- 'verismo' was a most appropriate style for this production.

    [Seen on "Telemundo" Network - just then becoming a subsidiary of the part Italian invested Apollo Group]
  • comment
    • Author: Samulkree
    Many may think this is just another Venezuelan telenovela (soap opera) with all the car accidents, amnesia, and lost babies typical of telenovelas. THEY ARE NOT MISTAKEN! It has a very promising and magical story about a young girl named "Llovizna" (Drizzling Rain - Interesting name) who finds out that her mother was killed by the powerful owner of the steelmill where her grandfather worked and died after being burned. She sets out to destroy him and is caught in her own trap on the way, risking the lives of all the people she loves. She ignores a truth that is shocking (I wont spoil it!). The story has some typical elements of telenovelas but is refreshingly different. Unfortunately, the acting is quite amateurish and the setting is extremely cheap. The production company, Marte TV, has gone out of business and this was one of their last productions. The main problem with the telenovela is that it lacks great actors to give life to their complex characters. They make it extremely simple. Caridad Canelon's "Marhuanta" is the only commendable performance. The other either suck or are mediocre. The story is a bit tragic and mean spirited which may also turn off viewers. Overall, it is an interesting telenovela with an original story that ultimately ends up being mushy and typical. It is a decent production which would have been a masterpiece if well-performed and produced. Unfortunately, "Llovizna" lacks the elements necessary to make a great Soap Opera. This is only recommended for avid telenovela viewers who usually enjoy telenovelas from Venezuela like me.
  • Series cast summary:
    Scarlet Ortiz Scarlet Ortiz - Yolanda Llovizna Sánchez 145 episodes, 1997
    Luis Fernandez Luis Fernandez - Orinoco Fuego 145 episodes, 1997
    Pablo Martín Pablo Martín - Caroní Fuego / - 145 episodes, 1997
    Javier Vidal Javier Vidal - Pío Heres Briceño 144 episodes, 1997
    Caridad Canelón Caridad Canelón - Marhuanta Sánchez 144 episodes, 1997
    Catherine Correia Catherine Correia - Salvaje Callao 143 episodes, 1997
    Elisa Escámez Elisa Escámez - Nieves Fuego 138 episodes, 1997
    Mildred Quiroz Mildred Quiroz - Diamante Falcón Heres 137 episodes, 1997
    Yoletty Cabrera Yoletty Cabrera - Soledad Barrancos 136 episodes, 1997
    Natalia Capelletti Natalia Capelletti - Concordia 135 episodes, 1997
    Alfonso Medina Alfonso Medina - Lanzarote Niño 132 episodes, 1997
    Henry Castañeda Henry Castañeda - Guasipati 131 episodes, 1997
    José Ángel Urdaneta José Ángel Urdaneta - Patrio Morales 126 episodes, 1997
    Winston Vallenilla Winston Vallenilla - José Miguel Andueza 115 episodes, 1997
    Roberto Messutti Roberto Messutti - Eloy Cardoso 115 episodes, 1997
    Juan Carlos Baena Juan Carlos Baena - Luis Luis 111 episodes, 1997
    Norma Matos Norma Matos - Jade Heres 104 episodes, 1997
    Erika Medina Erika Medina - Siria Degredo 101 episodes, 1997
    Lisette Luna Lisette Luna - Josefa (Tata) 98 episodes, 1997
    Nacarid Escalona Nacarid Escalona - Alejandra de Hipolito 96 episodes, 1997
    Ángela Hernández Ángela Hernández - Heucaris 68 episodes, 1997
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