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» » The Disreputable Mr. Raegen (1911)

Short summary

The first scene shows his entrance into a saloon and that the police officials know the man and his unenviable reputation. Inside the saloon a young collector carelessly displays a roll of ... See full summary
The first scene shows his entrance into a saloon and that the police officials know the man and his unenviable reputation. Inside the saloon a young collector carelessly displays a roll of bills in his wallet, and in paying his bill for drinks, slips the wallet into the back pocket of his trousers. Another habitué of the saloon, a man by the name of Smith, feigning to drop his hat, deftly picks the pocket of the young collector and slips the empty wallet, after removing the bills, into Raegen's pocket. Of course the alarm is spread, and in a tremendously exciting scene, in which Smith puts out the lights, the place is raided by the police, Smith has escaped. We see Smith return to his flat in a tumble-down tenement and display the money which he has brought to his old mother and to the little child of the story. The child is hungry and cries for food. Suddenly they hear a noise outside; it is the police! Stopping the child's cries, they put her into a closet, and closing the door, ...

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    • Author: Naktilar
    A story of the East Side of New York by Richard Harding Davis satisfactorily interpreted by the Edison players. Perhaps its chief interest lies in the East Side realism which finds graphic expression in the tumble down tenements, the robbery in the saloon and the chase by the police. The little girl and her big protector are not impossible characters, yet such instances are extremely rare in that haunt of sorrow and hunger. This gives the picture a human touch which adds to its interest and assists in the dramatic interpretation of a life little known outside of Nov York. The audience expresses its approval of the result in Reagan's case. The Sunday school idea of reform is gratified when it is made plain that he decides to turn over a new leaf, as the saying goes, and care for the little waif whom fate thus placed in his way. - The Moving Picture World, April 8, 1911
  • Cast overview:
    Charles Ogle Charles Ogle - Mr. Raegan
    Richard Neill Richard Neill
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